Discover BC’s Magazines #SubscribeBC

British Columbia is home to over 300 magazines, representing a broad diversity of publications, ranging from small to large, literary to lifestyle, leisure to arts and culture, news, business, and special interest magazines featuring the unique culture of Pacific Northwest lifestyle and culture. Discover and revisit some of our favourite magazines:

 

BC ORGANIC GROWER

Published quarterly by COABC, BC Organic Grower covers B.C.’s organic growing culture.

Image: BC Organic Grower Fall 2020 Issue

 

THE CAPILANO REVIEW

For over forty years, The Capilano Review has supported and been sustained by a vibrant community of readers, writers, and artists interested in experimentation in writing and art.

 

EXPLORE MAGAZINE

Equal parts inspiration and perspiration set the stage for Explore, Canada’s number-one publication for outdoor adventurers since 1981.

 

EVENT MAGAZINE

EVENT publishes fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction and literary reviews.

EVENT 49-2 Poetry and Prose

 

FOLKLIFE

FOLKLIFE is a semi-annual print publication inspired by lives of wild intention, living on rocks in the ocean.

 

Magazine | Folklife – SALT Shop

 

 

GEIST MAGAZINE

Geist is the Canadian magazine of ideas and culture—every issue brings together a sumptuous mix of fact + fiction, photography and comix, poetry, essays and reviews, and the weird and wonderful from the world of words.

None

 

 

HAKAI MAGAZINE

Hakai Magazine explores science, society, and the environment in compelling narratives that highlight coastal life and phenomena.

biologist J. D. F. Gilchrist on the deck of the SS Pieter Faure

Image: Scientists Surveyed the Sea off South Africa—1890s Style by Jock Currie

 

 

LOOSE LIPS MAGAZINE

Loose Lips is a Vancouver-based feminist publication covering local arts, culture, women’s health and current events.

 

THE TYEE

The Tyee is an independent, online news magazine from B.C. founded in 2003 devoted to fact-driven stories, reporting and analysis that informs and enlivens our democratic conversation.

Tyee logo

 

 

MONTECRISTO MAGAZINE

MONTECRISTO collaborates with some of the finest writers, illustrators, and photographers working in Vancouver to create an engaging, eclectic editorial mix, including fashion, culture, food, wine, travel, books, art, beauty, business, architecture, design, and more. The magazine also puts a particular emphasis on philanthropy and local history, as well as artisans and craftspeople in Vancouver and abroad.

 

NUVO MAGAZINE

NUVO magazine is Canada’s authority on all things exceptional—a combination of style and purpose, featuring and profiling people, places, and possessions.

 

 

PACIFIC RIM MAGAZINE

PRM connects geographically disparate readers across the Pacific Rim through stories of community, travel, food, and technology that honour both our cultural diversity and shared experiences.

Get your digital copy of Pacific Rim Magazine issue

 

PRISM INTERNATIONAL

PRISM international is a quarterly magazine out of Vancouver, British Columbia that connects readers with the literary community through author interviews, book reviews, news about Canadian writing and publishing events.

 

RICEPAPER MAGAZINE

Ricepaper Magazine is a Vancouver-based Canadian magazine that has showcased Asian Canadian literature, culture, and the arts since 1994.

Illustration by Arty Guava

 

 

ROOM MAGAZINE

Room is Canada’s oldest feminist literary journal, and has published fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, art, interviews, and book reviews for forty years.

 

SAD MAGAZINE

SAD MAG is an independent magazine dedicated to covering Vancouver’s independent arts and culture from the perspective of local, emerging writers and artists.

SAD Issue 30: Death Cover

 

VANCOUVER MAGAZINE

Vancouver magazine is the indispensable playbook to Canada’s most exciting city. For over 50 years, this city’s influencers have turned to our iconic brand for insightful, informative coverage of the issues, the people, the places and the events that shape Vancouver.

Vancouver Magazine

 

WESTERN LIVING MAGAZINE

As Canada’s largest regional magazine, Western Living invites readers to stretch their imaginations about living in the West: Western Living shares what intrigues, surprises and thrills us about people, places, homes, gardens, food and adventure from Winnipeg to Victoria and everywhere in-between.

Western Living BC, Late Fall 2020 by Canada Wide Media - issuu

B.C. Finalists up for Canadian Online Publishing Awards

The Canadian Online Publishing Awards (COPAs) honour and celebrate the best in online publishing in Canada. The awards are split into four divisions; Academic, Consumer, Business to Business and News Media. Typically an in-person celebration, this year’s COPAs Awards Party will be held digitally with a virtual audience component. Learn more about the Canadian Online Publishing Awards and stay tuned for the announcement of the live digital event.

From curated environmental editorial to business, lifestyle and design, here are the B.C.-based finalists.

 

BEST ARTICLE OR SERIES – ACADEMIC

Indigenous Reporting | Adapt

The Thunderbird | Body disposal not a burning issue for B.C.

 

BEST INTERACTIVE/INFOGRAPHIC STORY – ACADEMIC

The Thunderbird | The uninformed voter’s guide to the federal election

The Thunderbird | Local sailors worry as tanker traffic grows

 

BEST PRINT & DIGITAL PUBLICATION – ACADEMIC

Link Magazine

 

BEST WEB SITE – ACADEMIC

The Thunderbird

 

BEST PRINT & DIGITAL PUBLICATION – BUSINESS

BC Broker Magazine

 

BEST INVESTIGATIVE ARTICLE OR SERIES – CONSUMER

Hakai Magazine | Big Fish: The Agricultural Revolution

Hakai Magazine | From Berth to Death

 

BEST PHOTOJOURNALISM – CONSUMER

Hakai Magazine | Sea Lion Search and Rescue

Hakai Magazine | Salvaging Fossils on the Jurassic Coast

 

BEST VIDEO CONTENT – CONSUMER

Hakai Magazine | A High-Pressure Job

 

BEST EMAIL NEWSLETTER DESIGN – CONSUMER

Hakai Magazine

Vancouver Magazine

Western Living

BEST PRINT & DIGITAL PUBLICATION – CONSUMER

Western Living BC + AB, September 2020 by Canada Wide Media - issuu

Western Living

 

BEST WEB SITE DESIGN – CONSUMER

Hakai Magazine

Vancouver Magazine

 

 

Get on island time with Gabriola Island’s new magazine: FOLKLIFE

FOLKLIFE is a big and bold biannual lifestyle print magazine inspired by the lives of wild intention, living on rocks in the ocean. Evoking fine craftsmanship with its minimalist design, matte aesthetic, poetic editorial, and vibrant photography, FOLKLIFE honours the art and agriculture, business and creativity, food and farming, and dwellings and nature of the intentional lives of British Columbia’s Gulf Islanders.

As the only semi-annual lifestyle print magazine solely featuring content from the Gulf Islands, FOLKLIFE celebrates and connects those living simply, and as an art form, through engaging interviews, stories, photographs, recipes, and art.

 

 

Discover and follow FOLKLIFE: 
Website
Instagram

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British Columbia Magazines nominated for the 43rd Annual National Magazine Awards

For the first time since its debut in 1977, the National Magazine Awards will be held as a virtual broadcast through our digital channels. Creators, storytellers, editors, publishers, and all magazine stakeholders from coast to coast to coast are invited to join the live, interactive Winners Celebration on Facebook, which will be hosted by award-winning writer, editor, content strategist and journalism instructor, Sandra Martin.

The four Best Magazine Awards honour the magazines that most consistently engage, surprise and serve the needs of their readers. These awards recognize outstanding achievement in magazine publishing over the past year. The jury shall evaluate each magazine according to four general criteria quality, currency, design, and reader experience.


Best Magazine: Service + Lifestyle

Explore Magazine

 

Writing & Visual Awards

Columns

From “Two Dads: A Father’s Day Story”

Culture, The Tyee
WRITER: Dorothy Woodend
HANDLING EDITORS: Robyn Smith, Paul Willcocks

Service Journalism

Vancouver Magazine, 2019

The Ultimate Vancouver Wine Buying Guide, Vancouver Magazine
CREATORS: Neal McLennan, Cathy Mullaly
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR: Anicka Quin

One of a Kind Storytelling 
Found Objects, The Malahat Review
CREATOR, Rowan McCandless
HANDLING EDITOR, Iain Higgins

Personal Journalism 

Chimera, Room Magazine
WRITER: Emily Urquhart
HANDLING EDITOR: Arielle Spence

Essays 

Chimera, Room Magazine
WRITER: Emily Urquhart
HANDLING EDITOR: Arielle Spence

Poetry

The Way / Study of a Torso, Event Magazine
Writer: Cassidy McFadzean
Handling Editor: Shashi Bhat

Cold Dying Black Wet Cold Early Thing, The Malahat Review
Writer: John Elizabeth Stintzi
Handling Editor: Iain Higgins

Marriage Poems, Geist Magazine
WRITER: Matsuki Masutani
HANDLING EDITOR: AnnMarie MacKinnon

Fiction 

Right to Grapple, The Malahat Review
WRITER: Liz Harmer
HANDLING EDITOR: Iain Higgins

The Dahlia, subTerrain
WRITER: Adam Elliott Segal
HANDLING EDITOR: Brian Kaufman

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From Ground Zero, Illustration by Brandon Blommaert

Ground Zero, Geist Magazine
WRITER: Barbara Black
HANDLING EDITOR: MichaĄ KozĄowski

The Last Snow Globe Repairman in the World, PRISM international
WRITER: Hsien Chong Tan
HANDLING EDITORS: Emma Cleary, Jasmine Sealy

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The Art of Asking with Nav Nagra, Publisher of Room Magazine

On March 11th, Room Magazine is hosting its fourth annual literary and arts festival celebrating diverse Canadian writers and artists, Growing Room. The festival was created in commitment to deepen learning about inclusion and accessibility, both within the systemic structures of the festival and the creative curation. Growing Room is a celebration, a protest, a reflection, a re-visioning, a gathering, a question, and a dream.

Nav Nagra, who was recently appointed as the new publisher of Room Magazine is no stranger, having been a collective member since 2014 holding various roles. Her passion for the publishing industry has taken her through various initiatives and organizations throughout the province including consultancy with Breathing Space Creative, serving on the board of Vancouver Art Book Fair and the Professional Development Committee of AFP Vancouver.

We speak to Nav about her journey with Room Magazine and multi-disciplinary skills that have afforded her a wealth of experience in British Columbia’s publishing industry.

 

 

Tell us a little about yourself, your work and Room Magazine.

I’m a first-generation Canadian and I feel like this and the culture I was raised within really informed my interest in storytelling. Most of my life was spent living in a multi-generational house with a Grandmother who loved sharing stories and quite frankly, gossip and I think those interactions made me want to become a storyteller. I made sure my education was always centered around books and writing and then shortly before I graduated from university, I found out about Room Magazine and inquired about getting involved with the magazine. I started at Room Magazine in 2014 as the Advertising Coordinator, moved onto our Editorial roster and now am extremely humbled to be Publisher. I have published a few small pieces of poetry and hope this year will bring about a lot more writing for me.  I’m also currently working on what I hope will be a novel.

 

For those who may not be familiar with B.C.’s magazine publishing industry, what are your thoughts on the ever-evolving landscape? What does the future of magazine publishing look like?

I think the future of magazine publishing will see magazines appearing on more than one platform in more than one format. We’re seeing it now with magazines starting podcasts, YouTube channels, and other types of audience engagement. I don’t think print is dead and I may be naive in thinking so, but I don’t see print going anywhere for a while. I do think that magazines need to be a bit nimble going forward and work towards becoming as digitally accessible as possible while maintaining a print presence.

 

What were the early days of your career like? How did you get to where you are now?

The early days of my career were really formed by me asking a lot of questions and finding ways of getting involved in editorial work. I have an accidental art history background and this led to my work at an art gallery and creating artist catalogues for emerging and established artists. I was almost rabid in my university days trying to find any publication that would allow me to write an article or blog post about pretty much anything. As I moved within my career, I always made sure that I could do something that would bolster my editing abilities and allow me to write. I guess I am where I am now because I would always say yes and then scope out the next opportunity. And though I acknowledge that not everyone has the privilege of doing this, I am very glad I was able to.

 

What inspires you as a creator?

I am very inspired by music and movies. I love reading but I find that I am so baffled by the talent of the writers I read that I never feel I can create such amazing works so I take the emotions I feel from movies and music and translate that into my writing and other creations. My influences change so quickly it’s really hard to narrow it down. Right now, I would say from a writing standpoint, I am most inspired by Carmen Maria Machado, Roxane Gay, and Chelene Knight. Oh! And Fleabag – I found so much inspiration from that show.

 

 

What advice would you give to someone starting out in the industry?

Ask questions! The art of asking is real and if you’re able to, ask lots of questions. One thing that I like to do if I’m interested in a certain aspect of the industry is I ask if I can go to coffee with someone just to find out how they got where they are or if they have any advice. For the most part, folks are more than happy to sit down with someone to share some wisdom. I know that I would not be where I am if I hadn’t just asked.

 

What accomplishments are you most proud of?

As of now, it’s definitely becoming the Publisher of Room Magazine. If you had asked me in 2014 where I thought my path would lead with Room, I would have never thought I would end up as Publisher. I am so humbled in my role and by the team at Room.

 

Are there any upcoming events or initiatives in the pipeline for Room Magazine?

Yes! Our Growing Room literary and arts festival is happening in Vancouver from March 11th – 15th and features so many amazing artists and writers. You can find out more and get your tickets at festival.roommagazine.com.

 

Visit Room Magazine’s website for more information.

An Interview With Ricardo Khayatte Publisher and Editor-in-Chief at Vancouver Weekly

“People need to know they can trust what you put out there” – Ricardo Khayatte 

Ricardo Khayatte has an eclectic background. “In another life, I was a musician,” he said with a smile as he recalled his musical past. From an early age, Khayatte has been embedded in the local music scene performing with various bands, producing, and songwriting while having the unique privilege of being surrounded by great producers like Humberto Gatica, Mauricio Guerrero and even Canadian songwriting icons like Jim Vallance and Eddie Schwartz.

After high school, Khayatte moved to Boston to study songwriting at Berklee School of Music and then continued in the music industry writing for artists and performing in an alt-country folk band called The Reckoners.  When he returned to Vancouver in 2005, Khayatte launched his first company, IndieMV Media Group, in the hopes that he could figure out a way to provide independent artists with innovative monetization solutions for their art that truly made a difference. “I’ve always had a soft spot for the underdog and still believe that independent artists are key to a thriving music industry.”

Khayatte wanted to expose people to the underground arts scene happening in Vancouver and as a result, he started Vancouver Weekly, which has grown to become one of Vancouver’s top digital publications. “When I first started Vancouver Weekly, it was a small blog filled with my own writing. In a matter of months, I had 50 contributors who were out reviewing theatre, film, and music in the city and as it progressed further and our numbers grew — long-form features, profiles, and even cultural and social commentary emerged within the publication.”

Khayatte credits the quick uptake to the quality Vancouver Weekly’s team of writers has produced as well to the strong relationships in and amongst the creative communities in the city. “We like to support and work closely with festivals, music venues, theatre companies, and arts organizations in Vancouver — hopefully, we can continue to give locals and those visiting Vancouver, an alternative perspective on what is going on in and around the city.”

 

 

Vancouver Weekly has become a training ground for aspiring writers and budding journalists. It has also become a community of, and for, writers. It’s a bit of an incubator in a way and gives writers the opportunity to learn from each other, to explore style and tone, and to develop relationships that will see them through the next step in their career. “So many of our writers and contributors go on to work for major publications and come back to say that they not only got their training here, they also got to immerse themselves in what was happening in Vancouver at that time.”

While Vancouver Weekly remains a digital publication, Khayatte holds on to the idea that it may one day translate into a print publication. “There’s something romantic about print, especially as a writer. Digital is often about instant gratification – you skim stories and access things immediately. With print, you absorb the information differently. Both have their advantages, and both are needed.”

Like with most arts endeavours, funding is Vancouver Weekly’s biggest challenge. Khayatte sat on the board for MagsBC and saw just how hard it is to find support for both print and digital publications. “We aren’t just competing against local publishers – there are more and more US publications infiltrating our market, and we need to think about what the Canadian voice is going to be moving forward.”

As new media journalism continues to shift, Khayatte continues to seek innovative business models and unique narrative themes to bring to the public. He is launching a variety of new media projects this year, including a new social audio app called Sayy.it that he co-founded with a team of engineers Kiky Tangerine, Patrick Sears, and Barry Steyn.

“The goal behind Sayy.it is to bring together the world’s most influential thinkers onto a social audio platform that sparks unique discussions on a number of topics from environmental sustainability to mental health, technology and business, and of course, a genre that will always be close to my heart, the arts.” — Ricardo Khayatte 

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An Interview With AnnMarie MacKinnon for Geist Magazine

Publishing is a challenging field to work in, and the landscape keeps changing. To continue to succeed, we need help with staff retention. -AnnMarie MacKinnon

Annmarie Mckinnon has been a long time reader of Geist magazine, a BC-based literary magazine publishing since the ‘90’s. She even studied it during her degree in publishing and communications, so, when a job opened up at the well respected magazine, she jumped at the chance.

“When I was growing up, literature in Canada definitely had a certain feel to it. It was all about big trees and isolation and survival, but we have other stories to tell,” says AnnMarie. She is excited to see the face of Canadian literature changing, especially since she’s been at Geist. Under her leadership, there’s now an emphasis on opening doors to new voices and exploring different modes of storytelling.

It’s an exciting time for Geist, with AnnMarie taking the helm and becoming the third publisher of the magazine since its inception 28 years ago. Yet, it’s also a time of change and transition, especially in terms of recruitment. “There’s no shortage of people interested, but it’s tough to train them and get them the experience they need when there aren’t enough resources.” “A lot of people have this idea that working in magazine publishing is glamourous,” jokes AnnMarie. “It’s definitely not The Devil Wears Prada around here – it’s hard work, long hours. Your eyes burn from reading all the submissions…and I wouldn’t trade it for anything!”

More than 200,000 people read Geist each year, and the publication contributes greatly to the zeitgeist of what’s happening culturally, both in Vancouver and across Canada. “Like all creative industries, we’re in the business of telling stories, one way or another. We’re talking about what’s happening in the world around us. There’s a lot of courage and bravery happening in literature right now.” For AnnMarie, the highlight of her job is finding emerging writers. “I love working with young people who are just getting started, and helping them to make their piece even greater. It’s so satisfying when they get to see their work finally in print, and I know that, in some small way, I helped launch them into something bigger.”

The media landscape is changing, with people able to set up websites to showcase their work in just a few short hours. It can be hard to attract investment in the publishing industry. “Creative BC has been awesome, giving us access to grant money and recognizing literature and publishing as creative endeavors. We need to continue to educate people that writing is an art, while also reminding them about all of the invisible work that goes into publishing a magazine like Geist.”

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Congratulations to the 41st Annual Magazine Award Nominees!

 

The 41st Annual Magazine awards are taking place this June at the Arcadia Court in Toronto. We complied a list of all the BC nominees – check them out!

 

Best Magazine: Lifestyle

Explore-Vancouver

Published by: My Passion Media Brad Liski, publisher David Webb, editor Edwin Pabellon

Art Direction Grand Prix

Issue 23: Cheese

SAD Mag-vancouver

art director Pamela Rounis

Art Direction of a Single Magazine Article

The Fifth Coast

Mountain Life Annual – BC/ON

contributor Amelie Legare, art director Leslie Anthony, editor Kristen Wint

Best Editorial Package

Only in Canada

Cottage life mag-BC/Toronto

art director Michelle Kelly, Jackie Davis, Blair Eveleigh, Liann Bobechko, Braden Alexander, editors Kim Zagar

Long-Form Feature Writing 

Hakai Magazine-Victoria

handling editor J.B. MacKinnon, writer Jude Isabella

Feature Writing

The Hunger Games: Two Killer Whales, Same Sea, Different Diets

Hakai Magazine-Victoria

handling editor Larry Pynn, writer Adrienne Mason

Dammed and Determined

Kootenay Mountain Culture Magazine- Kootneys

Bob Keating, writer Mitchell Scott, handling editor Tara Cunningham, Mitchell Scott,

Peter Moynes, Chris Rowat, Darren Davidson, Vince Hempsall, Mike Berard

Columns

City Informer

Vancouver Magazine-Vancouver

Stacey McLachlan, writer

Investigative Reporting

The Ecolabel Fable

Hakai-Victoria

handling editor Raina Delisle, writer Jude Isabella

Fiction

Food for Nought

Malahat Review -Victoria

handling editor Shashi Bhat, writer John Barton

Before he Left

Malahat Review -Victoria

handling editor Jason Jobin, writer John Barton

Visions

Taddle creek- BC

handling editor Lisa Moore, writer Conan Tobias

Poetry

No Buffalos

Malahat Review-Victoria

Handling editor Délani Valin, poet John Barton,

Migrations: Salt Stories

Room Magazine- Vancouver/BC

handling editor Juliane Okot Bitek, poet Navneet Nagra

When Louis Riel Went Crazy

Taddle creek- BC

handling editor Katherena Vermette, poet Conan Tobias

Illustration

Paul Goes West

Taddle creek- BC

Art Director Michel Rabagliati, illustrator Conan Tobias

Portraits Photography

Towing the Line

Vancouver Magazine-Vancouver

Editor Carlo Ricci, photographer Paul Roelofs, art director Stacey McLachlan

 

 

 

 

 

For More Information on the 41st Annual Magazine CLICK

 

 

Magazine Profile: Dance International

Dance International covers classical and contemporary dance in all its facets, locally, nationally and internationally, with lively critical analysis, expert commentary and superb photography. The quarterly magazine informs and delights readers with in-depth coverage of the diversity that inspires the art form.

Dance International makes an important contribution to the public conversation about dance of today, while offering reflection and insight into the past. As well, with almost 40 years of continuous publication, they provide a historical record of dance in British Columbia, Canada and abroad that is a valuable resource for scholars and the general public. BC has many prominent locals that have achieved international success in the dance world, including choreographer Crystal Pite.

The magazine has humble origins as a newsletter for the Vancouver Ballet Society almost 40 years ago. Now a 64-page quarterly featuring articles from local and international writers, the magazine is distributed not only in Canada, but also in the U.S. and around the world.

 

“For a lot of our writers, dance is their life, it’s their career and they invest a lot of their own time and money researching and being involved in dance. I feel it’s important that we’re there to support them.”

–       Kaija Pepper, Editor Dance International

 

Learn more about Dance International on their website and follow along with them on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

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Life Tree Media – The Best of Both Worlds

With a commitment to helping, healing and inspiring its readers, LifeTree Media brings written works to life by publishing books and offering authors additional editorial and marketing services.

Founded in 2013 by Maggie Langrick, LifeTree Media has made a name for itself in the publishing industry for its commitment to aiding personal growth and conscious communication. Pushing the boundaries of the traditional publishing model, the hybrid publishing model employed by LifeTree Media is giving more self-financed authors access to the mainstream marketplace. The creative and distribution services offered by LifeTree Media has contributed to the success of its published works.

In combination with Pink Velvet Couch, LifeTree Media is co-hosting an all day Book Publishing Boot Camp in Vancouver on Tuesday, March 6. The event is aimed at helping first time authors find out exactly what it takes to plan, write, publish and market a nonfiction book!

Some great authors LifeTree has worked with will be sharing their insights at the event, including Tracy Theemes, The Financially Empowered Woman  + Lindsay Sealey, Growing Strong Girls.

To learn more about the event click here.