The Heels!

Vancouver’s very own, The Heels, have released their new music video “Come Aroundthat mentions BC places and is shot from Vancouver to the Coquihalla, through Merritt and the Nicola Valley. How many places can you recognize?

Supported by Creative BC, the sassy song-writers are a captivating balance of three-part harmonies, grit and glamour.

Follow The Heels at theheelsmusic.com and all major social media platforms as The Heels Music.

Website: www.theheelsmusic.com
Facebook: https://facebook.com/theheelsmusic/
Twitter: @theheelsmusic
Instagram: @theheelsmusic

Western Living Magazine

Originally from Salmon Arm, Julia Dilworth knew from an early age that she wanted to work at a Magazine. With a great deal of passion for the arts, Julia studied at UBC, Langara and BCIT, and with multiple degrees she now can hang her hat on two doors. Associate Editor for Western Living and Vancouver Magazine, Julia says she is “living the dream”.

Set for a move this fall, Julia is looking forward to applying some of Western Living Magazine’s home décor advise to her new living space. In addition to her growing passion for home décor Julia is very excited about this December’s issue where upcoming trends are explored and discussed. Vintage recipes will also be a highlight for this issue as local chefs have re-done recipes previously published in issues from the 70’s and 80’s to have a modern twist. Keep your eyes peeled for Western Living’s Christmas Plum Pudding.

Western Magazine has been providing readers with tips and stories as well as guides to travel, gardening and real estate, food, restaurants, wine-pairings and home design for over three decades. As Canada’s largest regional magazine, published 10 times a year, Western Living invites readers to stretch their imaginations about living in the West. 

 

Finger Food Studios – Helping you Drive Innovation

Finger Food is an award-winning technology company that helps businesses drive innovation and growth with solutions that utilize holographic computing, cognitive computing and the Internet of Things. Founded in 2009 by CTO Trent Shumay and led by CEO Ryan Peterson as a video game company, Finger Food pivoted in 2016 to embrace holographic technology, becoming the first company in Canada to become a Microsoft HoloLens agency partner.

With the support of its diverse and dedicated team of fearless innovators, Finger Food has built numerous large-scale holographic applications for global companies, including PACCAR, Lowe’s, Deschutes Brewery, Cirque du Soleil and more.

Constantly tackling projects with creativity and curiosity, Finger Food is home to the largest dedicated holographic development space in the world: The Holodeck. With over 25, 000 square feet of devoted warehouse space in Port Coquitlam, The Holodeck, is a game-changing, facility that enables the design and development of mixed and augmented reality applications. The applications and possibilities now available are vast and far-reaching.           

The 30th Annual Vancouver Writers Fest Explores the Power of Storytelling!

This year The Vancouver Writers Fest celebrates a remarkable 30-year history and Creative BC staff members have been present and in full support of the festivities! Inaugurated in 1988 and now a staple event in the literary community, The Vancouver Writers Fest brings local and international readers and writers together to reimagine the world we live in through storytelling.

This annual Festival is complimented with year-round programming where readers of all ages are encouraged to explore the Incite reading series at the Vancouver Public Library, Spreading the Word programs, and various special events with leading writers.

Find out more about The Vancouver Writers Fest programs.

 

 

 

POWELL RIVER LIVING MAGAZINE

Isabelle Southcott’s publication, Powell River Living Magazine, recently celebrated its tenth anniversary, marking over a decade of serving the local Powell River community.  Nestled on the upper Sunshine Coast, Powell River Living Magazine is a locally owned and independent, leisure and lifestyle publication that reflects the lives and needs of local residents.

Southcott, a seasoned journalist who began her successful career working with daily newspapers in Nova Scotia, launched Powell River Living Magazine after realizing that her community was being underserved by the publishing industry.  She wanted to offer her readers the option of reading a magazine that focused on human successes rather than the sensationalism that so often consumes the industry.  Today, along with her Associate Publisher, Sean Percy, Southcott continues to offer her community access to diverse perspectives with 16 issues published per year for residents to enjoy.

She’s Calling the Shots

2xMore and BC Creates host a panel discussion with top executives from DHX Media, Rainmaker Entertainment as well as “2X More” program participant Heather Hawthorn-Doyle. On Thursday, March 2, join Women in View and BC Creates as they host “She’s Calling the Shots: Advancing Women Directors in Animation and Live Scripted.” The panel discussion taking […]

Creative Industries Week 2017

British Columbia is celebrating four BC’s industries that unite to form BC’s vibrant creative economy: film + tv; digital entertainment; music + sound recording; and book and magazine publishing.

This economy is thriving with increased activity locally and expanded presence internationally. From February 27 to March 4, 2017, these four industries join government and industry stakeholders to celebrate the official Creative Industries Week. Kicking off with a launch reception and events at  the BC Legislature,  the week’s agenda will include activities that the public may join for – from the Career Expo to Digital day, and a VIFF screening to participating events at The Vancouver Writers’ Fest.

BC’s dynamic creative sector is a key contributor to our diverse and growing economy. Annual BC revenues for film, television and digital media alone combined is $3 billion. The creative industries support 65,000 full-time skilled jobs plus thousands of part-time and contract workers.

Creative Industries Week aims to:

  • increase awareness and understanding across BC of the creative industries, their growing contributions to BC’s economy and the exciting career opportunities available in this sector;
  • unite the creative industries in the co-creation of an inter-industry showcase that offers networking and engagement for all who participate;
  • provide the Province of BC and the public with direct opportunity for engagement and connection with the creative industries at a time of unprecedented opportunity and innovation.

We hope you’ll join us at one of our events! Check out the Calendar of Activities

Calendar of Events Feb 27 – Mar 5, 2017

Celebrate Creative Industries Week with Us!

 

2017 Calendar of Events


 

Monday, February 27

Creative Industries Week 2017 Launch & Reception
6:30 pm – 8:30 pm (by invite)
Victoria, BC

Tuesday, February 28

Creative Industries Week Showcase
11:00 am – 1:30 pm (by invite)
Victoria, BC

Wednesday, March 1

BC Creates Community Builders Award Reception
6:30 pm (by invite)
Vancouver, BC

Vancouver Writers Festival + VPL, InCite – PUBLIC EVENT
7:30 pm
Vancouver Public Library

Thursday, March 2

She’s Calling the Shots: Advancing Women Directors in Animation + Live Scripted – PUBLIC EVENT
Space is limited. Free Admission but RSVP required.
RSVP to amber@womeninview.ca
4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Vancity Theatre, 1181 Seymour Street
www.viff.org

Arts Umbrella South Surrey 5th Anniversary
6:00 pm
Surrey, BC

VIFF Presents Window Horses – PUBLIC EVENT
Special Reception + Screening with Director Ann Marie Fleming
Reception at 6:15 pm
Screening at 7:30 pm
Vancity Theatre, 1181 Seymour Street
www.viff.org

Friday, March 3

MPPIA Film + Television Career Expo – PUBLIC EVENT
10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Canada Post Building, 425 West Georgia Street
mppia.com/events/career-expo/registration

Saturday, March 4

Digital Day
9:30am – 6:30pm
Anvil Centre, 777 Columbia Street, New Westminster
digitaldays2017.com

Don’t Miss CUFFED – It’d Be a Crime

On the weekend of March 11 to 13 criminal minds from all corners of the country will descend upon Granville Island. Some of them specialize in constructing alibis for murders, while others take great pains in weaving intricate forms of blackmail, revenge or the silencing of secrets forever. No two think alike, but they all share at least one thing in common: they would love to meet you.

Later this month CUFFED: The International Crime Writers Festival will welcome 20 of today’s hottest crime fiction talent to Performance Works and the Granville Island Hotel. For three days some of the genre’s best-known Canadian talent will tell audiences how they craft relatable villains, ambiguous anti-heroes and tell richly dark stories of human failings that seem all-too-believable – and indeed, might also draw upon disquieting facts.

The lineup of assembled talent is impressive: Linwood Barclay (his novel “No Time For Goodbye” has been translated into nearly 30 languages), Gail Bowen (creator of the Joanne Kibourn book series), Terry Gould (investigative journalist and non-fiction author), C.C. Humphreys (creator of the French Executioner and the Jack Absolute series) and B.C.’s Owen Laukkanen (“The Professionals”) are just five of the 20 authors that will be speaking at CUFFED. Crime reporter Kim Bolan, who’s known for her coverage of the criminal underbelly in “The Vancouver Sun”, will also be a featured speaker and guest at CUFFED.

Ian Rankin CUFFED festival

Scottish crime author Ian Rankin created the character of Inspector Rebus and is a supporter of CUFFED. Rankin’s Rebus is one of the genre’s best-selling sleuths, appearing in more than a dozen bestselling novels and has also been adapted into television.

With a Little Help from Scotland’s Criminal Mastermind

While this is the inaugural launch of the CUFFED festival, it’s already got an internationally heavyweight champion behind it. Scottish author Ian Rankin, creator of one of today’s most popular fictional detectives (Inspector Rebus), helped raise funds for CUFFED’s launch from an event put on last year.

“Readers realize that along with a compelling narrative, crime fiction says important things about the state of the modern world and asks tough moral questions, making us think about our societies, our institutions and ourselves,” said Rankin. “Crime Fiction Festivals are springing up over the globe and I am positive CUFFED will prove to be one of the jewels in this crown – especially with Alma Lee in charge.”

Alma Lee is the Producer of CUFFED and the former Artistic Director of the Vancouver International Writers Festival. It was during her time spent at that organization Lee first saw growing appetite from audiences eager to explore the nuances of crime fiction. “When Lonnie Propas (CUFFED’s Artistic Director) approached me to help him produce a ‘genre’ festival it seemed like a good idea,” Lee explains. “When we decided to go forward we got nothing but highly positive response from everyone we spoke to – publishers, writers and readers all of which made us confident that we could pull it off.”

With votes in confidence from Ian Rankin – as well as letters of support from other influential crime fiction writers like Louise Penny and Quintin Jardine – the CUFFED team are hopeful that this will be the first of many more CUFFED festivals to come. Chances are good that they won’t be dead wrong.

 

Visit the CUFFED website: www.cuffedfestival.com

Purchase tickets for the venues.

Ryan Reynolds made the Deadpool movie in his hometown of Vancouver.

Deadpool Movie Is a Hit, Both at the Box Office & for B.C.’s Economy

This weekend’s release of Deadpool shattered all box office expectations, creating a new record for a February movie release with $135 million dollars. It also forged a new record for the highest-opening for an R-rated film, beating 2003’s The Matrix Reloaded by more than $40 million dollars.

Filmed in various locations in the Lower Mainland, Deadpool also gives our local film production industry another win: the movie injected $40 million dollars into B.C.’s economy for the 58 days it shot here. Over 2,000 crew members, local actors and extras were employed, giving these trained workers $19 million in wages.

“Vancouver continues to be an attractive and competitive production hub, with outstanding scenery,” commented David Starke, Executive Vice President, Physical Production for Twentieth Century Fox. “We were thrilled to shoot in B.C. where we had access to some of the best cast and crew, and a variety of locations that provided the ideal backdrop for so many of the movie’s most exciting scenes.”

Starke may be referring to the climactic car chase and gunfight sequence that was filmed on downtown Vancouver’s Georgia Street Viaduct. In April 2015 the Deadpool production shot on the Viaduct, with the roadway closed to traffic for 10 days. The sequence is one of the movie’s longest ones, showing off the False Creek waterfront and skyline of Vancouver as the red-and-black costumed superhero squares off against armed bad guys.

deadpool georgia viaduct

Deadpool faces bad guys on Vancouver’s Georgia Viaduct.

Facts & Figures from Deadpool’s Bottom Line

“I have seen firsthand the enormous positive impact that productions like Deadpool have had on our city,” said Gregor Robertson, Vancouver’s Mayor. “Film and television production continues to be a billion dollar industry here, and it is a growing contributor to Vancouver’s nation-leading economic growth.”

The Mayor makes an important point. Vancouver and B.C. have earned the nickname “Hollywood North” for the hundreds of movie and television productions that have filmed in our backyard. But when you take a closer look at the dollar impact, you’ll begin to see how this creative sector helps pump tens of millions of dollars into our economy.

For example, on just the Deadpool production alone:

  • The crew spent nearly $815,000 on hotel rooms, catering and food costs
  • Nearly $780,000 was spent on truck & car rentals, plus additional transportation costs
  • North of $735,000 went to construction costs on the movie
  • And more than $1 million was earmarked on location costs

 

The Reynolds Connection

While B.C.’s reputation for highly experienced crews helped, let’s not forget that local boy-made-good Ryan Reynolds also played a huge part in getting Deadpool to the big screen. Reynolds had first originated the merc with a mouth character in 2009’s X-Men Origins: Wolverine, which had some pick-up photography shot at UBC. While that movie’s version of the character wasn’t what Reynolds had hoped for, his belief in giving Deadpool a second screen chance and getting back to the comic book roots of the hero have now paid off.

“I got to push it to my hometown…really so I could see my mom,” the actor recently told etalk about why he fought to get his movie made where his roots are. “But Vancouver has some of the best production facilities in the world and I really wanted to be in Vancouver and be home.”