An Interview With Ricardo Khayatte Publisher and Editor-in-Chief at Vancouver Weekly

“People need to know they can trust what you put out there” – Ricardo Khayatte 

Ricardo Khayatte has an eclectic background. “In another life, I was a musician,” he said with a smile as he recalled his musical past. From an early age, Khayatte has been embedded in the local music scene performing with various bands, producing, and songwriting while having the unique privilege of being surrounded by great producers like Humberto Gatica, Mauricio Guerrero and even Canadian songwriting icons like Jim Vallance and Eddie Schwartz.

After high school, Khayatte moved to Boston to study songwriting at Berklee School of Music and then continued in the music industry writing for artists and performing in an alt-country folk band called The Reckoners.  When he returned to Vancouver in 2005, Khayatte launched his first company, IndieMV Media Group, in the hopes that he could figure out a way to provide independent artists with innovative monetization solutions for their art that truly made a difference. “I’ve always had a soft spot for the underdog and still believe that independent artists are key to a thriving music industry.”

Khayatte wanted to expose people to the underground arts scene happening in Vancouver and as a result, he started Vancouver Weekly, which has grown to become one of Vancouver’s top digital publications. “When I first started Vancouver Weekly, it was a small blog filled with my own writing. In a matter of months, I had 50 contributors who were out reviewing theatre, film, and music in the city and as it progressed further and our numbers grew — long-form features, profiles, and even cultural and social commentary emerged within the publication.”

Khayatte credits the quick uptake to the quality Vancouver Weekly’s team of writers has produced as well to the strong relationships in and amongst the creative communities in the city. “We like to support and work closely with festivals, music venues, theatre companies, and arts organizations in Vancouver — hopefully, we can continue to give locals and those visiting Vancouver, an alternative perspective on what is going on in and around the city.”

 

 

Vancouver Weekly has become a training ground for aspiring writers and budding journalists. It has also become a community of, and for, writers. It’s a bit of an incubator in a way and gives writers the opportunity to learn from each other, to explore style and tone, and to develop relationships that will see them through the next step in their career. “So many of our writers and contributors go on to work for major publications and come back to say that they not only got their training here, they also got to immerse themselves in what was happening in Vancouver at that time.”

While Vancouver Weekly remains a digital publication, Khayatte holds on to the idea that it may one day translate into a print publication. “There’s something romantic about print, especially as a writer. Digital is often about instant gratification – you skim stories and access things immediately. With print, you absorb the information differently. Both have their advantages, and both are needed.”

Like with most arts endeavours, funding is Vancouver Weekly’s biggest challenge. Khayatte sat on the board for MagsBC and saw just how hard it is to find support for both print and digital publications. “We aren’t just competing against local publishers – there are more and more US publications infiltrating our market, and we need to think about what the Canadian voice is going to be moving forward.”

As new media journalism continues to shift, Khayatte continues to seek innovative business models and unique narrative themes to bring to the public. He is launching a variety of new media projects this year, including a new social audio app called Sayy.it that he co-founded with a team of engineers Kiky Tangerine, Patrick Sears, and Barry Steyn.

“The goal behind Sayy.it is to bring together the world’s most influential thinkers onto a social audio platform that sparks unique discussions on a number of topics from environmental sustainability to mental health, technology and business, and of course, a genre that will always be close to my heart, the arts.” — Ricardo Khayatte 

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An Interview With AnnMarie MacKinnon for Geist Magazine

Publishing is a challenging field to work in, and the landscape keeps changing. To continue to succeed, we need help with staff retention. -AnnMarie MacKinnon

Annmarie Mckinnon has been a long time reader of Geist magazine, a BC-based literary magazine publishing since the ‘90’s. She even studied it during her degree in publishing and communications, so, when a job opened up at the well respected magazine, she jumped at the chance.

“When I was growing up, literature in Canada definitely had a certain feel to it. It was all about big trees and isolation and survival, but we have other stories to tell,” says AnnMarie. She is excited to see the face of Canadian literature changing, especially since she’s been at Geist. Under her leadership, there’s now an emphasis on opening doors to new voices and exploring different modes of storytelling.

It’s an exciting time for Geist, with AnnMarie taking the helm and becoming the third publisher of the magazine since its inception 28 years ago. Yet, it’s also a time of change and transition, especially in terms of recruitment. “There’s no shortage of people interested, but it’s tough to train them and get them the experience they need when there aren’t enough resources.” “A lot of people have this idea that working in magazine publishing is glamourous,” jokes AnnMarie. “It’s definitely not The Devil Wears Prada around here – it’s hard work, long hours. Your eyes burn from reading all the submissions…and I wouldn’t trade it for anything!”

More than 200,000 people read Geist each year, and the publication contributes greatly to the zeitgeist of what’s happening culturally, both in Vancouver and across Canada. “Like all creative industries, we’re in the business of telling stories, one way or another. We’re talking about what’s happening in the world around us. There’s a lot of courage and bravery happening in literature right now.” For AnnMarie, the highlight of her job is finding emerging writers. “I love working with young people who are just getting started, and helping them to make their piece even greater. It’s so satisfying when they get to see their work finally in print, and I know that, in some small way, I helped launch them into something bigger.”

The media landscape is changing, with people able to set up websites to showcase their work in just a few short hours. It can be hard to attract investment in the publishing industry. “Creative BC has been awesome, giving us access to grant money and recognizing literature and publishing as creative endeavors. We need to continue to educate people that writing is an art, while also reminding them about all of the invisible work that goes into publishing a magazine like Geist.”

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Congratulations to the 41st Annual Magazine Award Nominees!

 

The 41st Annual Magazine awards are taking place this June at the Arcadia Court in Toronto. We complied a list of all the BC nominees – check them out!

 

Best Magazine: Lifestyle

Explore-Vancouver

Published by: My Passion Media Brad Liski, publisher David Webb, editor Edwin Pabellon

Art Direction Grand Prix

Issue 23: Cheese

SAD Mag-vancouver

art director Pamela Rounis

Art Direction of a Single Magazine Article

The Fifth Coast

Mountain Life Annual – BC/ON

contributor Amelie Legare, art director Leslie Anthony, editor Kristen Wint

Best Editorial Package

Only in Canada

Cottage life mag-BC/Toronto

art director Michelle Kelly, Jackie Davis, Blair Eveleigh, Liann Bobechko, Braden Alexander, editors Kim Zagar

Long-Form Feature Writing 

Hakai Magazine-Victoria

handling editor J.B. MacKinnon, writer Jude Isabella

Feature Writing

The Hunger Games: Two Killer Whales, Same Sea, Different Diets

Hakai Magazine-Victoria

handling editor Larry Pynn, writer Adrienne Mason

Dammed and Determined

Kootenay Mountain Culture Magazine- Kootneys

Bob Keating, writer Mitchell Scott, handling editor Tara Cunningham, Mitchell Scott,

Peter Moynes, Chris Rowat, Darren Davidson, Vince Hempsall, Mike Berard

Columns

City Informer

Vancouver Magazine-Vancouver

Stacey McLachlan, writer

Investigative Reporting

The Ecolabel Fable

Hakai-Victoria

handling editor Raina Delisle, writer Jude Isabella

Fiction

Food for Nought

Malahat Review -Victoria

handling editor Shashi Bhat, writer John Barton

Before he Left

Malahat Review -Victoria

handling editor Jason Jobin, writer John Barton

Visions

Taddle creek- BC

handling editor Lisa Moore, writer Conan Tobias

Poetry

No Buffalos

Malahat Review-Victoria

Handling editor Délani Valin, poet John Barton,

Migrations: Salt Stories

Room Magazine- Vancouver/BC

handling editor Juliane Okot Bitek, poet Navneet Nagra

When Louis Riel Went Crazy

Taddle creek- BC

handling editor Katherena Vermette, poet Conan Tobias

Illustration

Paul Goes West

Taddle creek- BC

Art Director Michel Rabagliati, illustrator Conan Tobias

Portraits Photography

Towing the Line

Vancouver Magazine-Vancouver

Editor Carlo Ricci, photographer Paul Roelofs, art director Stacey McLachlan

 

 

 

 

 

For More Information on the 41st Annual Magazine CLICK

 

 

Magazine Profile: Dance International

Dance International covers classical and contemporary dance in all its facets, locally, nationally and internationally, with lively critical analysis, expert commentary and superb photography. The quarterly magazine informs and delights readers with in-depth coverage of the diversity that inspires the art form.

Dance International makes an important contribution to the public conversation about dance of today, while offering reflection and insight into the past. As well, with almost 40 years of continuous publication, they provide a historical record of dance in British Columbia, Canada and abroad that is a valuable resource for scholars and the general public. BC has many prominent locals that have achieved international success in the dance world, including choreographer Crystal Pite.

The magazine has humble origins as a newsletter for the Vancouver Ballet Society almost 40 years ago. Now a 64-page quarterly featuring articles from local and international writers, the magazine is distributed not only in Canada, but also in the U.S. and around the world.

 

“For a lot of our writers, dance is their life, it’s their career and they invest a lot of their own time and money researching and being involved in dance. I feel it’s important that we’re there to support them.”

–       Kaija Pepper, Editor Dance International

 

Learn more about Dance International on their website and follow along with them on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

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Life Tree Media – The Best of Both Worlds

With a commitment to helping, healing and inspiring its readers, LifeTree Media brings written works to life by publishing books and offering authors additional editorial and marketing services.

Founded in 2013 by Maggie Langrick, LifeTree Media has made a name for itself in the publishing industry for its commitment to aiding personal growth and conscious communication. Pushing the boundaries of the traditional publishing model, the hybrid publishing model employed by LifeTree Media is giving more self-financed authors access to the mainstream marketplace. The creative and distribution services offered by LifeTree Media has contributed to the success of its published works.

In combination with Pink Velvet Couch, LifeTree Media is co-hosting an all day Book Publishing Boot Camp in Vancouver on Tuesday, March 6. The event is aimed at helping first time authors find out exactly what it takes to plan, write, publish and market a nonfiction book!

Some great authors LifeTree has worked with will be sharing their insights at the event, including Tracy Theemes, The Financially Empowered Woman  + Lindsay Sealey, Growing Strong Girls.

To learn more about the event click here.

 

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Magazine Profile: The Claremont Review

The Claremont Review is a literary magazine that features outstanding fiction and poetry by young writers between the ages of 13 and 19. The magazine has about 650 to 700 annual subscribers that are primarily based in the U.S. and Canada, although they have begun shipping more issues internationally.

The magazine is edited by volunteers, who take on a great amount of work during the journal’s busiest period, from January to April. During those first few months of the year, the editors finalize and edit selections for the spring issue, write their Canada Council grant application, run the annual contest, and compile a shortlist for the judges.

“If you want to know the future, pay attention to what youth are doing in their art, what they are trying to tell you or show you about the human condition and what is possible for humanity.”

–       Jody Carrow, Co-Editor The Claremont Review

The Claremont Review has seen significant changes over the years. Artwork within the journal’s pages is now printed in colour, the number of international submissions has increased, and they have doubled the prize money for their annual contest. A unique feature of The Claremont Review is the guaranteed feedback they provide on submissions, which supports and encourages young writers and artists.

 

Stay up to-date on The Claremont Review by following them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

 

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Where Vancouver/ Where Whistler

Since 1936, Where remains the world’s largest publisher of visitor magazines. Where Vancouver, (which encompass print, web, and social media) provides timely, local information on shopping, cultural attractions, and dining as well as what’s hot and upcoming in entertainment. Where’s magazines and online properties are created by local editors and staff who have current in-depth knowledge about their cities because they themselves live in the city they write about.

Sheri Radford, Editor of Where Vancouver (nine issues per year) and Where Whistler (two issues per year), knew she needed the hustle and bustle of big city living and returned to Vancouver after some time exploring island life in Lady Smith on Vancouver Island. Out of school, Sheri started as a technical writer but after 2 years she switched to into the magazine publishing industry and has been with Where Vancouver and Where Whistler for over 15 years.

Sheri can be found most mornings jogging along Vancouver’s seawall taking in all that her beautiful city has to offer. In addition to the Magazine Editor hat, Sheri is also the author of several award-winning books for children.

 

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GEIST MAGAZINE

Geist is a Canadian literary magazine of ideas and culture. They publish the best that can be found in narrative (fiction and non-fiction), essays, poetry, reviews, photography, drawings, commix, puzzles and little-known facts of interest—with a special interest in fresh interactions between text and image. Geist strives to be articulate, humorous and identifiably Canadian. Their mandate is to find and encourage a wide audience for new and established Canadian writers and artists of merit.

Currently, their readership extends from Newfoundland to Vancouver Island to Nunavut, with concentrations in the Lower Mainland of BC and greater Toronto. The Geist website, geist.com, receives 110,000 visits each year, and is supported by a strong social media presence: 3,000+ Facebook fans and friends; 11,400+ Twitter followers; 14,000+ subscribers to the weekly e-newsletter.

Geist began as a 40-page newsprint publication in the founders’ (Mary Schendlinger and Stephen Osborne) living room in 1990, with financing of $7,500. They paid artists and writers for their work from the beginning. In 1993 they hired their first full-time, permanent staff; in 2000, the editor-in-chief and senior editor began to receive a small stipend. The team edited with care, built gradually, promoted constantly, tracked results and brought the personal touch to re

lationships with readers and contributors, and Geist grew into the most widely read literary magazine in Canada. Geist has won critical acclaim and has received dozens of awards and nominations from the National Magazine Awards and the Western Magazine Awards. Most recently (this year), Geist won gold at the National Magazine Awards for a photo-essay by Terence Byrnes called “South of Buck Creek.”

Their inspiration is always found in the world around them and in the wealth of talented writers, artists, performers and creators, past and present, that they encounter in their work. They’re always on the alert for the great conversation or chance meeting that sparks a great Geist idea.

 

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Western Living Magazine

Originally from Salmon Arm, Julia Dilworth knew from an early age that she wanted to work at a Magazine. With a great deal of passion for the arts, Julia studied at UBC, Langara and BCIT, and with multiple degrees she now can hang her hat on two doors. Associate Editor for Western Living and Vancouver Magazine, Julia says she is “living the dream”.

Set for a move this fall, Julia is looking forward to applying some of Western Living Magazine’s home décor advise to her new living space. In addition to her growing passion for home décor Julia is very excited about this December’s issue where upcoming trends are explored and discussed. Vintage recipes will also be a highlight for this issue as local chefs have re-done recipes previously published in issues from the 70’s and 80’s to have a modern twist. Keep your eyes peeled for Western Living’s Christmas Plum Pudding.

Western Magazine has been providing readers with tips and stories as well as guides to travel, gardening and real estate, food, restaurants, wine-pairings and home design for over three decades. As Canada’s largest regional magazine, published 10 times a year, Western Living invites readers to stretch their imaginations about living in the West.